Queda livre

tulipnight:

At the End of Every Journey by Eye of the Storm Photography on Flickr.

fotojournalismus:

"For almost 1,000 years, the Rabari have roamed the deserts and plains of what is today western India. It is believed that this tribe, with a peculiar Persian physiognomy, migrated from the Iranian plateau more than a millennium ago. The Rabari are now found largely in Gujarat and Rajasthan.”

Photos by Jimmy Nelson

(via yagazieemezi)

architectureofdoom:

Dom Bosco Sanctuary, Brasilia, Carlos Alberto Naves, 1963.
Stained glass by Hubert Van Doorne. View this on the map

architectureofdoom:

Dom Bosco Sanctuary, Brasilia, Carlos Alberto Naves, 1963.

Stained glass by Hubert Van Doorne. View this on the map

coelasquid:

I’m a puff baby that can dance like a man I can poop on your couches I can poop on your hand I’m a seed eating baby who will peck all your buns Peck all your buns, I will peck all your buns If there’s water on the floor I will splash there for fun

coelasquid:

I’m a puff baby that can dance like a man
I can poop on your couches I can poop on your hand
I’m a seed eating baby who will peck all your buns
Peck all your buns, I will peck all your buns
If there’s water on the floor I will splash there for fun

expressions-of-nature:

eclipsed : John Dale

asylum-art:

The Veiled Ghosts of  Livio Scarpella

The work of Italian contemporary artist Livio Scarpella turns good and evil into delicacy.  This group of sculptures, named “Ghosts Underground”, depicts lost souls anguishing beneath the effect of a thin veil.  Scarpella’s interest in this subject was inspired by a trip to the Sansevero Chapel in Naples, home to Antonio Corradini’s “Veiled Christ”.  Before that time, he mostly exhibited paintings for a decade. By mixing influences of Rococo sculptors like Corradini with modern iconography, Scarpella explores a struggle with religious faith.  He couples his “blessed” and “damned” figures with light and dark colored mineral rocks, like amethyst and quartz, inside the chest.  They are hardened hearts that embody the ghost hidden within. Reminiscent of Michelangelo’s The Prisoners, these gentle busts unveil the ghost within. Scarpella takes this idea to a new level in his recent work. His exhibit “Fuori dal Tempo” (“Out of Time”) now showing at Gallery Gomiero in Italy, looks at the theme of sin without repentance.  Undeniably, Scarpella pursues a morbid imagination dominated by smug virtue and natural beauty.

“Fuori dal Tempo” by Livio Scarpella is on view at Gallery Gomiero in Milan, Italy